Sundance Demonstrates VR Filmmakers Can Produce But Will Consumers Watch?

Published by , February 5, 2018 3:06 pm

(Wired) Scores of movies and TV shows now have headset-ready experiences to accompany them. Birdman director Alejandro González Iñárritu’s VR installation Carne y Arena even won a special-achievement award from the Academy of Motion Pictures. The world VR pioneers envisioned in 2014 has come to pass. “Everything I could’ve imagined to legitimize the artform, almost all of it’s happened,” says former Oculus Story Studio producer Edward Saatchi, who last week launched his new immersive film studio, Fable. “The only thing that hasn’t happened is, like, any evidence that consumers will purchase it—which is a fairly significant missing piece. So the really important ‘What now?’ is demonstrating you can make revenue.”
Oh yes, that old chestnut: making money. If you’re a startup, nascent industry, or even just a person with a good idea, you know you’ve made it when people start wondering if you’re a goldmine. For VR filmmakers, that time is coming—if not already here. With the recent news that VR-in-space experience Spheres had been acquired for seven figures at the Sundance festival, it’s clear the medium is moving into the realms normally occupied by traditional filmmakers and studios, but that’s only part of the necessary shift. Getting a company to acquire a piece of content and getting consumers to watch it are two different things.

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